Featured

a book and painting sale

On December 11, 2016 (from 10 AM to 4 PM), I will be at the Delta Hotel (Fredericton, New Brunswick) at Sandra’s Christmas Market Fredericton to sell my paintings and books. This is the first time I have ever tried selling at a craft show and I will be sure to report back on the experience.

~

I began preparing for this event in July, painting a number of small canvasses, all on themes associated with the poems in my book within easy reach (Chapel Street Editions, Woodstock, 2016). Here are a few of the paintings I will have for sale. They are all priced to sell and I will give a discount for anyone buying both a book and a painting.

~

Here is a sample of the paintings I have for sale:

 

On December 11, 2016 (from 10 AM to 4 PM), I will be at the Delta Hotel (Fredericton, New Brunswick) at Sandra’s Christmas Market Fredericton to sell my paintings and books. This is the first time I have ever tried selling at a craft show and I will be sure to report back on the experience.

~

I began preparing for this event in July, painting a number of small canvasses, all on themes associated with the poems in my book within easy reach (Chapel Street Editions, Woodstock, 2016). Here are a few of the paintings I will have for sale. They are all priced to sell and I will give a discount for anyone buying both a book and a painting.

~

DSCF2491

August 20, 2016 ‘pick faster’ Jane Tims (10″ x 10″) acrylic, gallery edges ($30)

~

Jane Tims August 25 2016 'rose hips'

August 25, 2016 ‘rose hips’ Jane Tims (10″ x 12″) acrylic, gallery edges ($30)

~

dscf3342

October 21, 2016 ‘blueberries’ Jane Tims (5″ x 7″) acrylic, gallery edges ($20)

~

Scan0020

July 31, 2016 ‘wild strawberries’ Jane Tims (10″ x 8″) acrylic, gallery edges ($25)

~

Untitled

August 14, 2016. ‘wild hops’ Jane Tims (12″ x 10″) acrylic, gallery edges ($35)

~

IMG_4863

August 16, 2016 ‘high bush cranberries’ Jane Tims (12″ x 10″) acrylic, gallery edges ($35)

~

My books and paintings would be imaginative Christmas gifts for anyone who loves poetry, wants to re-kindle their own memories of berry picking or gathering other wild plants, or wants a small painting for a corner of a favourite room. I am thinking someone who has a home bar might like ‘wild hops’.

~

I hope the market goers love them! If you are in the Fredericton area on December 11, I hope to see you there!

~

Copyright 2016  Jane Tims

Advertisements
Featured

getting ready for fall!

It may seem early, but I have my sights set on November. I plan to sell my book and some of my paintings at a local Christmas market. To have enough paintings ready for the event, I have to start painting now!

~

The main objective will be to sell copies of my book ‘within easy reach’. To keep in the theme of gathering wild edibles, I plan to do paintings of some of the wild fruit we have in New Brunswick:

  • blackberries, in the style of the painting on the cover of my book
  • wild strawberries
  • raspberries
  • low bush blueberries
  • apples

~

My plan is to offer both books and paintings for sale. Since I dread just sitting behind my table, waiting for someone to have a closer look, I will take a couple of canvases and paint as I wait!

~

!cid_A570666B-7C46-4223-8857-0A35F2DC2B1E

~

Copyright 2016 Jane Tims

winner of the painting ‘berries and brambles’

I am so pleased to announce the winner of my painting ‘berries and brambles’.  The winning raffle entry was drawn at a dinner I attended last week in Fredericton.

~

The winner is Margo Sheppard, Fredericton!

~

Congratulations Margo!!! The painting ‘berries and brambles’ is yours. Thanks to all those who entered!

~

berries and brambles

April 24, 2016 ‘berries and brambles’ Jane Tims

~

Holding the raffles for my paintings has been a very enjoyable part of the process of marketing my book! I’ll be offering another painting to win at my reading at Tidewater Books in Sackville in the fall!

~

Copyright 2016 Jane Tims

fiddlehead season in New Brunswick

This time of year in New Brunswick, the fields and riversides are turning green. The leaves of the alders are the size of a mouse’s ear and that means fishing in the streams. The small leaves of the red maples are like green stars against a blue sky. And bouquets of fiddlehead ferns are unfolding in the wet meadows and along the shores.

~

Fiddleheads, the young coiled leaf fronds of the Ostrich fern (Matteuccia Struthiopteris (L.) Tod.), are a local delicacy in New Brunswick. Steamed, with a pat of butter, they are the perfect vegetable for a spring meal. Fiddleheads are one of the edible wild plants featured in my book ‘within easy reach’ (Chapel Street Editions). I will be launching my book at 7 pm on June 9, 2016 at Westminster Books in Fredericton. If you live in the Fredericton area, I would be so happy to see you there!

~

For more information on the fiddlehead, see https://janetims.com/2012/05/19/making-friends-with-the-ferns-2/

IMG_4271

Fiddleheads along the Saint John River in the Grand Lake Meadows

Featured

a cautionary note:

  1. never eat any plant if you are not absolutely certain of the identification;
  2. never eat any plant if you have personal sensitivities, including allergies, to certain plants or their derivatives;
  3. never eat any plant unless you have checked several sources to verify the edibility of the plant.
IMG199_crop

An example: I often make tea-berry tea (Gaultheria procumbens L.) because I love the wintergreen flavour, but tea-berry leaves contain an aspirin-like compound, so I limit the amount I consume

Wood-sorrel (Oxalis spp.)

When I walk around our property, whether in the woods or in the open areas, I often overlook a little group of plants that grows almost everywhere.  The leaves are like those of clover, but the five-petalled flowers of the genus Oxalis are as delicate as any spring wildflower.

~

I am familiar with two Wood-sorrels, one a plant of the woods and one a plant of more open areas.

Common Wood-sorrel (Oxalis acetosella L.) grows in damp woods. Other names for this plant are Wood-shamrock, Lady’s-sorrel, and, in French, pain de lièvre (literally, rabbit bread). The flowers of Common Wood-sorrel are white with pale red veins and can be found blooming from June to August.

The Yellow Wood-sorrels (Oxalis stricta  L. and Oxalis europaea Jord.) are low-growing weeds, found in waste places, along roadsides, in thickets, or in lawns and meadows. The Yellow Wood-sorrels are known by many names, including Lady’s-sorrel, Hearts, Sleeping-Beauty, and, in French, sûrette or pain d’oiseau (bird-bread). The flowers of Oxalis stricta and Oxalis europaea are yellow and bloom May to October.  Oxalis stricta and Oxalis europaea are considered separate species, but there is a lot of ambiguity in the various references, probably since both are called Yellow Wood-sorrel.  According to Grey’s Botany, Oxalis stricta has a tap-root, whereas Oxalis europeae has spreading and subterranean stolons.

The leaves of both Common and Yellow Wood-sorrels are pale green and clover-like.  Each leaf consists of three heart-shaped leaflets.  At night, the leaves fold downward.

The generic name oxalis comes from the Greek oxys meaning ‘sour’.  The common name ‘sorrel’ comes from the French word for ‘sour’.  Leaves of all species of Oxalis have a pleasant, tart taste and can be included in a salad as greens.  The leaves are also used in a tea, to be served as a cold drink.

Oxalic acids cause the plants’ sour taste.  Use caution ingesting this plant since it can aggravate some conditions such as arthritis, and large quantities can affect the body’s absorption of calcium.

To make a tea and a cold drink from Oxalis leaves, first pick, sort and wash the leaves…

Pour hot water on the leaves.  They turn brown instantly!  I left the tea to steep for about 10 minutes.

Strain and pour the sorrel-ade over ice cubes.  The Wood-sorrel tea makes a pleasant cold drink, with a tart taste and a familiar but elusive flavour.  Enjoy!

~

~

Common Wood-sorrel

Oxalis montana Raf.

~

Oxalis montana

carpets the grove

three green leaflets

lined in mauve, held low

in folds at night

narrow petals

creamy white, fragile

veins inked in red

Lady’s sorrel

nibbled, sour

rabbit bread

~

~

Previously published in 2012 at www.nichepoetryandprose.wordpress.com

©  Jane Tims  2016 

the edible and the inedible

When we were children, we often pretended to be storekeepers and picked various wild plants as the ‘food’ for sale.  We collected weed seeds for our ‘wheat’, clover-heads as ‘ice-cream’, vetch seed pods as ‘peas’, and (gasp) Common Nightshade berries as ‘tomatoes’.

This is probably a good place to urge you to teach your children – everything that looks like a vegetable or fruit may not be good for them to eat!  I don’t remember ever trying any of our pretend ‘groceries’, but some of them, such as the Common Nightshade berries, were poisonous and harmful.

berries of Common Nightshade are poisonous… later in the season, they are red and quite beautiful… children should be warned that all red berries are NOT good to eat

We also ‘sold’ the leaves of Common Plantain at our ‘store’.  They looked like spinach, and the Plantain leaves would have been fine for us to eat.

Common Plantain (Plantago major L.) is a very easily found weed since it grows almost everywhere, especially along roadsides, in dooryards and in other waste places.  Plantain is also known as Ribwort, Broad-leaved Plantain, Whiteman’s Foot, or, in French, queue de rat.  The generic name comes from the Latin word planta meaning ‘foot’.  Major means ‘larger’.

Plantain has thick, dark green, oval leaves.  These grow near the ground in a basal rosette.  The stems of the leaves are long and trough-like.  The leaves themselves are variously hairy and feel rough to the touch.  The leaf has large, prominent veins, and, as the plant grows older, these veins become very stringy.  The veins resist the breakage of the leaf and stick out from the stem end of a harvested leaf like the strings of celery.

Flowers of Plantain grow in a dense spike on a long, slender stalk rising from the leaves.  The flowers are small and greenish-white, appearing from June to August.

The young leaves of Common Plantain can be used in a salad or cooked and seasoned with salt and butter.  The older leaves are tough and stringy – not very palatable.

 

leaves of Common Plantain and Dandelion, picked from our dooryard, not yet washed or looked over for insects… note the strings protruding from the stem ends

~

 

~

~

wisdom

~

plantain, past the picking –

a pulled leaf resists,

tethered to a thread

~

~

©  Jane Tims  2012

Warning:
1. never eat any plant if you are not absolutely certain of the identification;
2. never eat any plant if you have personal sensitivities, including allergies, to certain plants or their derivatives;
3. never eat any plant unless you have checked several sources to verify the edibility of the plant.